Food for Thought

Last night I attended the 7th annual Hamentashen vs Latke Debate, in which world-renowned MIT professors in various fields of study discuss the socio-economic, scientific, historical and philosophical implications of triangular and circular foods. As the artist and sole non-MIT graduate here at Fire Hose, I am regularly amazed at the sense of play that pervades this dev team and the school from which they graduated.

A Biology prof offered a defense of Latkes (potato pancakes fried in oil) that transected the history of Tuberculosis immunology, recent Boston activity by the Center for Disease Control, and pre-WWII immigration. A mathematics professor on the side of Hamentashen (triangular cookies) explained with Photoshop and geometric trickery a solution to world hunger through the careful management of the sex lives of pastry. The entire event caused me to wonder what kind of video game could possibly bring to bear the intellectual passions of such diverse people. What games have been created with the creative flexibility to allow anyone, from any field of interest, to bring the best of themselves into the equation of play?

Games located in social networking sites would seem to offer a platform for such interactions, but they tend to narrow the communities involved rather than expand them. MIT takes advantage of the multi-disciplinary nature of a college campus to offer the diversity of this annual game. The closest community I can think of on the web, where varied peoples produce and consume diverse content that expresses the best of their creative process is the t-shirt website Threadless.com, where arguably the regular competitions work as a game.

How would you apply this to a console game?

Hamentahsen vs Latke, yo

Hamentahsen vs Latke, yo

7th Annual Hamentashen vs Latke Debate, MIT 4/4/09

7th Annual Hamentashen vs Latke Debate, MIT 4/4/09